Hammer and Chisel


Hello

If this is your first visit, welcome to Musings. If you have been here before, welcome back. Over time we are going to talk about many things: the past, the present, perhaps the future, travel, art, society and more. Wherever my musing takes me. I hope you will come along with me.

Click to check out my artwork

Hammer and Chisel

Sometime back I became interested in stone sculpture, specifically interested in how it is done.  I thought I would talk about that today.

From time to time while living in Arizona I  played around with shaping stones I had found.   Sandstone is plentiful along the roadside and it is relatively easy to carve.  Special carving tools are not necessary.  However, the sandstone often crumbles away and it will not take a high finish.

Horse and Rider

Horse and Rider

This little bronze, about 7 inches tall was cast from a mold taken off one of my early sandstone pieces.

But I wanted to make bigger and more advanced pieces.  About 20 years ago Luis Montoya, a renowned sculptor, taught stone carving here in West Palm Beach.  I took two sets of classes with Luis.

Sculpting requires preparation.  First off you need a stone with which to work.   There are sculpture supply stores that can get you nearly any kind you would want.  I like Alabaster or soap stone because they are relatively soft and easy to carve.  They also take a nice finish.  Second, one needs equipment:  Chisels, hammers, special sand papers or diamond abrasives, sand bags, and goggles if you are working with hand tools. Later if you graduate to power tools such as grinders and air hammers you also need a respirator, a compressor and the power tools themselves.

Sculpture Article

Sculpture Article

This picture was taken for an article about me as an artist/banker that appeared in Palm Beach Illustrated in 1996.  It gives you a glimpse of some of the trappings of the sculptor.  I am wearing  goggles and around my neck is the respirator I would wear if I was carving with power tools.  My wrists have special cuffs to protect against the vibration caused by air hammers.  My right hand, holding a hammer and a chisel, rests on a raw unworked stone.  My left hand is on a finished sculpture.  Notice how smooth and shiny it is.  That is what I refer to as a nice finish.

On the table there are rasps and a sleeve of chisels.  Each chisel is designed to do a different task.  Some are designed to remove lots of stone quickly; others are designed to help in shaping the stone; some are for delicate work.

Recently I started working on a new stone.  Here you can see it before I got started.

Getting ready to start

Getting ready to start

It is cushioned with sand bags placed on a work stand.  You can see the hammer and some chisels.  The next pictures show it beginning to take a shape.

Stone in progress

Stone in progress

Shaped stone

Shaped stone

Notice all the dust and chips around the work area.  Sculpture is very dirty work.  But I find it very rewarding.

Here are some examples of pieces I have done.

This work, Amore,

Amore

Amore

is in our garden.  The stone is marble and without the base the sculpture stands about 28 inches tall and weights a little over 300 pounds.  Moving it around is a problem.  In making the work I wanted to keep the sense of the stone block.

This next piece, Morning Grace, is Alabaster.

Morning Grace

Morning Grace

I studied the stone until the shape began to reveal itself.  The hardest stones for me are the square or rectangular blocks.  I like it best when the stone suggests the form.

Here is another piece, Reclining Diva,

Reclining Diva

Reclining Diva

that was inspired by the shape of the stone.  It is also Alabaster.  I have had a mold made of the sculpture and can have it cast in bronze.

Tango illustrates a problem that may arise with stone sculpture.

Tango in Alabaster

Tango in Alabaster

Often there is a grain or pattern that fights the form.  I liked this work but the colored markings especially in the faces of the figures was distracting.  This is what it looks like in bronze.  I think it reads better.

Tango

Tango

Bucking Bronco is another work I am pleased with.

bucking bronco

bucking bronco

It consists of two different stones, one for the horse and the other for the rider.  They are held together by two pins.  There is a mold of this work too so it can be cast in bronze.

I decided to write about my sculpture today because most people know me as a painter or print maker.  But, as you can see I also work three dimensionally.  Oh, and by the way, these need a nice home.  If you are interested, let me know.

More to come

If you like Musings, take a moment and click the subscription button on the side-bar to the right so you will be notified by e-mail when I make a new post.

****************************************

Books by Thomas L. Tribby Available
Click on title below to preview

Works on Paper

On The Waterfront

Impressions of Florida

********************************

Tribbyart’s Boutique

*****************************

Red Fish

Red Fish

Click
Formidable

Formidable

click

Dancing_Elephant

Dancing_Elephant

click

Advertisements

About Thomas L. Tribby

Professional artist: painter, sculptor, print maker. Maintains a studio in West Palm Beach, Florida
This entry was posted in art exhibit, life style, travel, Uncategorized, work and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s