Choo Choo Savannah


Hello

Today we are going to Muse about Savannah, Girl Scouts and most particularly about Railroads.  If this is your first visit, welcome to Musings. If you have been here before, welcome back. Over time we are going to talk about many things: the past, the present, perhaps the future, travel, art, society and more. Wherever my musing takes me. I hope you will come along with me.

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Choo Choo Savannah

Well Jeanette and I got out of town last week for a little R and R.  We were in need of a break.  Our summer has had an unusual amount of rain and it was starting to get to us.  So off we went heading to North Carolina to visit friends.

Savannah

The first stop along the way was historic Savannah, Georgia.  Have you been there?  We like it a lot.

While we were there, among our activities, we took a couple of hours to explore the Savannah Museum of History.  I learned several things I did not know before.  I thought I would tell you about them.

girls scouts

girls scouts

For example Savannah is the birth place of the Girl Scouts.  On March 12, 1912, Juliette Gordon Low founded the Girl Guides, which would become the Girl Scouts of the USA, the world’s largest voluntary organization for young women.

Julieete Gordon Lowe

Juliette Gordon Lowe

There is an entire section of the museum devoted to Mrs. Low and the Girls Scouts with an emphasis on the movement’s early formative years.

The museum is  downtown in the middle of  the historic district and abuts the Battlefield Memorial Park.

BATTLEFIELD MEMORIAL PARK

800px-Siege_of_Savannah_-_A.I._Keller

800px-Siege_of_Savannah_-_A.I._Keller

In what is now known as the Battle of Savannah, on October 9, 1779, more than 8,000 troops of three armies, French, American and British,  fought during the American Revolution.

The battle was the second bloodiest of the war. While Prevost claimed Franco-American losses at 1,000 to 1,200, the actual tally of 244 killed, nearly 600 wounded and 120 taken prisoner, was severe enough. British casualties were comparatively light: 40 killed, 63 wounded, and 52 missing.

The Battle of Savannah

The Battle of Savannah

Following the battle the Americans and French withdrew and the British retained control of the area until the close of the war.  The battle was  a defeat for the Americans.   Battlefield Memorial Park presents visitors with a memorial to those who fought in the battle , and marks where approximately 800 troops died or were wounded.

Battlefield Memorial Park

Battlefield Memorial Park

Seen here is the park.  The raised area in the distance was a fortification held by the British.

Influence on Haitian revolutionaries

Interestingly the battle is much remembered in Haitian history[citation needed]; the Chasseurs-Volontaires de Saint-Domingue, consisting of over 500 gens de couleur – free men of color from Saint-Domingue—fought on the French side. Henri Christophe, who later became king of independent Haiti, is thought to have been among these troops. Many other less notable Haitians served in this unit and formed the officer class of the rebel armies in the Haitian Revolution, especially in the North Province around today’s Cap-Haïtien where the unit was recruited.[citation needed]

I find this interesting because the United States has not treated Haiti well on many occasions.  It was one of the last countries to recognize the independence of Haiti after the Haitian Revolution severed ties with France.    Haiti is the only contemporary nation born of a slave revolt. Historians have estimated the slave rebellion resulted in the deaths of 100,000 blacks and 24,000 of the 40,000 white colonists, as well as many free people of color.   President Thomas Jefferson maintained an arms and goods embargo against the new country. Due to the pressure of southern Congressmen, who feared their slaves being encouraged by the revolt, the United States refused to recognize Haiti’s new government until 1867.  Furthermore,  in 1857 the United States took possession of Navassa Islanda unihabited Island just off of Port-o-Prince.  It is  an unincorporated territory of the United States to this day.  Haiti has claimed the island since 1801 and the island is in its constitution.  The US even occupied Haiti militarily from 1915 to 1934.  Not very gracious of us I say.

Roundhouse  Railroad Museum

Next to the park is the Roundhouse  Railroad Museum.  The Georgia Central railroad was centered here.

boxcars

boxcars

On display are many box cars, freight cars,  cabooses, and  engines as well as a turntable and the railway house.  The railway house, a National Historic Landmark, is interesting in its own right. Built in the 1850s, it’s the nation’s only remaining iron-roof structure and was important as an early example of a train/shop complex.

Many of the train cars are open and accessible.

Here you see Jeanette in one.

Inside Box car

Inside Box car

Fruit Growers Express

Fruit Growers Express

We went through a number.

As a child I was always fascinated by the Caboose.  No train was complete without one in my mind.  I wondered what was in that raised central section.

Caboose bench

Caboose bench

Well here you see it:  benches.  The train men could view the world in comfort.  The back section of the caboose had a stove, for heat and a table.

The railway house was a complex of workshops.  Some of it was lost to an earthquake, but what remains is interesting to explore.

Workshop

Workshop

workshop2

workshop

smokestack

smokestack

Smokestack explanation

Smokestack explanation

Of course the turntable is a central feature to the complex.  Here the engines and other equipment could be brought in on a single rail line and then directed to individual work and storage stalls.

Turntable and cars

Turntable and cars

turntable

turntable

Colored Shopman's facilities

Colored Shopman’s facilities

Engine

Engine

looking at turn table

looking at turn table

This is a unique complex, especially if you enjoy hands on exploration.  Check it out if you find yourself in Savannah.

More to come

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Works on Paper

On The Waterfront

Impressions of Florida

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Fields Oil on Canvas 48 x 24″

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Heartland  Oil on canvas 48" x 36"
Heartland Oil on canvas 48″ x 36

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Nebraska Oil on canvas 48″ x 38″ SOLD

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Montana Oil on canvas 60" x 30"
Montana Oil on canvas 60″ x 30″  SOLD

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About Thomas L. Tribby

Professional artist: painter, sculptor, print maker. Maintains a studio in West Palm Beach, Florida
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